United States ratification puts nuclear pact close to entry into force – UN agency

23 May 2008

The United States’ ratification of a key nuclear pact, which seeks to create uniformity in compensation for victims of nuclear accidents, brings it within shot of entering into force, the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has announced.

The United States’ ratification of a key nuclear pact, which seeks to create uniformity in compensation for victims of nuclear accidents, brings it within shot of entering into force, the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has announced.

The US has become the fourth nation to ratify the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC), following Argentina, Morocco and Romania. A further 13 States are signatories to the pact.

The most recent ratification means that only one or two more are needed for the CSC to go into effect, and is set to enter into force 90 days after ratification by at least five States with at least 400,000 units of installed nuclear capacity.

“The US ratification introduces a new dynamic in the process of establishing a global nuclear liability regime, which is particularly important given the anticipated growth in nuclear power around the world,” said Johan Rautenbach, Director of IAEA’s Office of Legal Affairs.

He voiced hope that the US’ action will spur other nations, particularly those with large nuclear power industries, to ratify the Convention.

The CSC, adopted in September 1997, covers both citizens in States with operational nuclear power plants, but also provides compensation for damages incurred across international borders.

News Tracker: Past Stories on This Issue

More than 100 States review global pact on nuclear weapons control – UN

Over 100 States took part in a two-week meeting seeking to pave the way towards the review of the United Nations-backed Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which forms the foundation of the world’s nuclear non-proliferation regime.