‘Fake news’ challenges audiences to tell fact from fiction

‘Fake news’ challenges audiences to tell fact from fiction

The emergence of so-called “fake news” has created “competing versions of information and the truth,” a situation which is challenging for audiences across the world; that’s according to a senior journalist who is joining a panel of experts at the United Nations on Thursday to discuss press freedom.

Farnaz Fassihi of the Wall Street Journal says that the rise of social media has made it more difficult for the average person to differentiate between verified facts and misinformation.

The issue of fake news is due to be discussed at the UN on World Press Freedom Day, which is marked annually on 3 May.

Daniel Dickinson began by asking Farnaz Fassihi to define fake news.

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The emergence of so-called “fake news” has created “competing versions of information and the truth,” a situation which is challenging for audiences across the world; that’s according to a senior journalist who is joining a panel of experts at the United Nations on Thursday to discuss press freedom.

Farnaz Fassihi of the Wall Street Journal says that the rise of social media has made it more difficult for the average person to differentiate between verified facts and misinformation.

The issue of fake news is due to be discussed at the UN on World Press Freedom Day, which is marked annually on 3 May.

Daniel Dickinson began by asking Farnaz Fassihi to define fake news.

Audio Credit
Daniel Dickinson, UN News
Audio Duration
13'37"
Photo Credit
UN News/Daniel Dickinson