PHOTO STORY: Photographers focus on human rights in Rio’s favelas

Shout out in the favela. The t-shirt reads Amarégay, a pun using the name of the Favela da Maré, meaning both to love is gay and Maré is gay.
Matheus Affonso
Shout out in the favela. The t-shirt reads Amarégay, a pun using the name of the Favela da Maré, meaning both to love is gay and Maré is gay.
Matheus Affonso considers himself an “LGBT photographer” and believes it’s important to “portray a population that is often invisible inside the favela”, or slum area.
Matheus Affonso
Mothers stand up in memory of their sons killed in the context of police operations.
Jacqueline Fernandes
The walls of a home shot multiple times display the word peace.
Jacqueline Fernandes
Young Brazilians protest calling for an end to racism.
Antonio Dourado
A homeless person sleeps on the streets of Rio de Janeiro.
Carolina Olgador
WellDonna Taiz Coelho advocates for her rights on the streets of Rio de Janeiro.  The sticker on her chest reads “stop killing us.”
Rodrigo Patricio Carvalho
The exhibit “If the Streets Were Ours, Our voice, our rights our future” at the Museum of Tomorrow in Rio de Janeiro.
UN Brazil/Naiara Azevedo
Jayathma Wickramanayake, Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth at the Museum of Tomorrow exhibit on human Rights in Rio de Janeiro.
UN Brazil/Tomas de Aboim