holocaust remembrance

‘Antisemitism fuelled the Holocaust and didn’t end’ 75 years ago, says education expert

Some were workers, some teachers, some neighbours. Many ordinary people enabled the Holocaust simply by doing their jobs. Some made the choice to help, while others decided to join in with the persecution, betraying Jewish friends and classmates.  But what “fuelled the Holocaust was antisemitism” which didn’t end with the defeat of the Nazis, and “continues today”, affecting all of society.

That’s according to Tad Stahnke, William and Sheila Konar Director of International Educational Outreach, part of the William Levine Family Institute for Holocaust Education, at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum.  He was at the United Nations Headquarters in New York for the Holocaust Remembrance Week and spoke to UN News’s Ana Carmo.

Mr. Stahnke started by talking about the Memorial Museum’s exhibition “Some were Neighbours”, which examines the role of ordinary people in the Holocaust, and the variety of motives that influenced individual choices. The traveling exhibit will be on view at the UN in New York, until 23 February, and across the world through the UN Information Centres.

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PODCAST: ‘Willing to die for the truth’ - lessons of hidden Jewish archive live on today

 Writer-director-producer Roberta Grossman, and executive producer, Nancy Spielberg were recently at UN Headquarters for the screening of their new film “Who Will Write Our History”. For this edition of our Lid Is On podcast from UN News, they sat down with Jessica Jiji during the UN’s Holocaust remembrance commemorations in New York, to talk about their film. 

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News in Brief 28 January 2019

  • ‘Where there is anti-Semitism, no one else is safe’: UN Chief tells Holocaust commemoration
  • Latin America must condemn violence against Venezuelan refugees and migrants: senior UN official
  • ‘Preparedness is crucial’ in fight against Ebola: health workers vaccinated in South Sudan
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Tackling ‘deeply worrying’ global rise in anti-Semitism is a job for all societies everywhere, says UN chief

Warning that anti-Semitism, the world’s oldest prejudice, has persisted to torment new generations, Secretary-General António Guterres has pledged that the United Nations will always be at the forefront of the fight against all forms of hatred, and work to strengthen efforts to uphold human dignity for all.

News in Brief 31 January 2018

Holocaust commemoration about the past and the future: UN Secretary-General

Although hatred may appear to be on the rise, people everywhere can unite to create a world of peaceful coexistence.

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Story of “Japan’s Schindler” shows how one can make a difference

A Japanese diplomat who rescued 6,000 Jewish families fleeing Nazi persecution in Lithuania showed how one person can make a difference, Cellin Gluck, the Director of a movie entitled "Persona Non Grata" has said.

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“Absolute evil” of terrorist attacks has historical precedent

The terrorist attacks in Paris, France, which led to the deaths of 129 people have been described as acts of “absolute evil” by a Holocaust event participant, at UN headquarters.

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