climate change

Wednesday's Daily Brief: UN bid to aid diabetics, Israel-Gaza attacks, climate change in Nepal, Iraq envoy appeal to MPs

A recap of Wednesday’s stories in brief: UN leads plan for insulin supply boosts; ‘No justification’ for Gaza border violence; Iraqis paying ‘unthinkable price’ in protests; $1.35 billion needed for Venezuela crisis; Record flooding affects 100,000 Nigerians.

Monday’s Daily Brief: Guterres on Bolivia and multilateralism, Syria and Iraq’s displaced, forest initiative, the healing arts

A recap of Monday’s stories in brief: UN chief spotlights multilateralism at peace forum; Bolivian authorities must uphold safety of citizens; new programme to feed Kenya’s children; experts concerned for detained in Syria and Iraq; UN forest management project fights climate crisis; and, from Warhol to the Wiggles – the role of art in keeping you healthy.

Natural hazards don’t always spell disaster: UN risk reduction chief

Tsunamis are rare, but when they strike, they are the deadliest and most costly of natural hazards. With half of the world’s population expected to live in coastal areas more prone to tsunamis by 2030, investing in early warning systems and resilient infrastructure, will be vital to saving lives and economies, said the top UN official on disaster risks on Tuesday.

Building resilience on Colombia's border: FAO

La Guajira, Colombia’s northernmost region, is dry with desert landscapes. It’s prone to drought and food insecurity particularly in rural areas. In recent years, the economic crisis in neighboring Venezuela has pushed over a million migrants across the border, including 165,000 people into La Guajira. The influx  has put a strain on host communities, where food is limited and natural resources scarce, so the UN Food and Agriculture Organization decided to take action.

From FAO, Anais Hotin and Charlotta Lomas have this special report. 

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Thursday’s Daily Brief: The power of mediation, Southern Africa food crisis, urban deaths, climate meeting update and Iraq protest latest

A recap of Thursday’s top stories: Guterres in Turkey underscores successes of mediation; 45 million lack food across Southern Africa; rights experts push to release Palestinian hunger striker; new UN health report targets causes of urban deaths; Climate change conference finds a new home; Iraq protests put country at ‘a crossroads’

Climate experts pledge to scale up high-altitude fight against mountain melt

The UN’s weather watchdog and partners committed on Thursday to a new initiative to ramp up observation and prediction technology that will help address the challenges of climate change, melting snow and ice, and water-related hazards.

The future of the planet ‘clearly in our hands’: top climate change scientist

There are clear benefits to keeping the earth’s temperature below two degrees; and the “choices we make now will be critical for the future of our oceans and cryosphere”.

That’s the message from Anjal Prakash, Coordinating Lead Author of the latest UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC report, on the havoc being unleashed on the earth’s oceans and ice caps. He spoke to UN News’s Sachin Gaur.

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UN summit tackles climate change-induced threat to mountain water supplies

The world’s mountain and glacier regions are facing unprecedented challenges due to climate change, imposing a crippling effect on the people and economies that rely on them, the UN’s weather agency explained on Tuesday, ahead of a summit to address the world’s rapidly-changing water systems.  

Global economy: ‘we must do everything possible’ to avoid global ‘fracture’ caused by US-China tensions, urges Guterres

Tensions around global trade and technology continue to rise and the international community needs to “do everything possible” to prevent the world being split into two competing spheres, led by the United States and China. 

After this year’s Climate Action Summit, what happens next?

People across the world need to embrace “fundamental change” in order to combat climate change and meet the target of restricting the increase in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius, Claudio Forner, from UN Climate Change in Bonn, told UN News in an interview that took place following the Climate Action Summit.