CITES

Wildlife trade: Regulated markets involving local communities, ‘essential’ to balance humans and nature

Since COVID-19 emerged in central China in late December, health officials have raced to locate where and how the virus was first transmitted from its likely animal origins, to humans.

As the main international regulator dealing with the wildlife trade - both legal and illegal - the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, CITES, is highlighting the crucial importance of developing a better balance in the relationship between people and the natural world.

Calling for further regulation of a trade which millions around the world rely on, as a source of income and protein, Ivonne Higuero, Secretary-General of CITES, has been speaking to UN News’s Siwen Qian, about the risks and opportunities involved.

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Ocean Conference shines light on illegal trade: CITES chief

The illegal trade in marine species is one of the major issues that needs to be under the spotlight at the UN Ocean Conference this week.

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“We’ve got to stop these guys” UN wildlife chief slams rosewood trade

“We’ve got to stop” the criminals who have turned endangered rosewood into the world’s most trafficked wild product.

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“Days of high profit and low risk from wildlife crime are over”

A surge in wildlife crime is being met with unprecedented efforts by the international community to combat it, a leading UN expert said Monday.

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More than 1,000 game wardens murdered protecting wildlife

Over 1,000 game wardens have been killed in the line of duty in the past ten years, the head of the UN-backed treaty that regulates global wildlife trade, CITES, has confirmed.

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UN and Africa: focus on Libya, global wildlife trade and Somalia

Libya “governed by chaos and anarchy” says UN envoy

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Combating corruption essential to implement SDGs

Corruption is an obstacle to progress and prosperity and holds back development, according to the UN.

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“Surge” in wildlife crime reported

A surge in wildlife crime, especially affecting elephants and rhinos, is being fueled by corruption according to the Secretary-General of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, also known as CITES.

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UN General Assembly proclaims 3 March as World Wildlife Day

The United Nations is highlighting the intrinsic values and contributions of wild animals and plants, particularly endangered and protected species, by devoting 3 of March as ‘World Wildlife Day.’

New fund to protect African elephants launched at UN-backed forum

Global conservation experts concluded a United Nations-backed meeting in Geneva today with important decisions to protect a number of endangered species, including the launch of a trust fund to ensure the long-term survival of the African elephant population.