art

COVID-19 linked to expected glut of stolen art for sale online, warns UN cultural agency

If you were offered the chance to buy a stunning African artefact, apparently with the blessing of the UN, what would you do?

For many people, it’s not obvious that the Organization never endorses or validates in any way, the sale of cultural treasures from any country.

In a warning to art lovers, the UN agency responsible for protecting endangered cultural heritage, UNESCO, has also said that increased pillaging of endangered World Heritage Sites during COVID-19 lockdowns, will likely result in a glut of stolen artefacts appearing online.

The development follows news of a new and sophisticated fraud ring that has been conning victims by using fake UNESCO permits.

In an interview with UN News’s Daniel Johnson, Ernesto Ottone Ramírez, Assistant Director-General for Culture of UNESCO, explains how to avoid being taken in by this lucrative scam. 

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UNESCO urges caution over fraudulent African artefacts, sold in its name

The UN on Wednesday revealed the existence of an illicit trafficking scam in African cultural artefacts, which are being sold to unsuspecting buyers, thanks to the entirely fake UNESCO stamp they come with.

Covid-19 crisis closes 90 percent of museums globally, UNESCO plans for reopenings

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc globally, museums have not been spared, the UN cultural agency said on Monday, International Museum Day, revealing that nearly 90 per cent of the treasured cultural institutions have had to close their doors, while almost 13 per cent are under serious threat of never reopening.

Tuesday’s Daily Brief: Syria, polio, DR Congo, Sudan updates, and, the art of stealing

Tuesday’s top stories include: A “daily nightmare” in Syria’s Idlib; polio remains an international health emergency; Guterres extends condolences as Australia bushfires continue; measles in DR Congo; clashes in Darfur displace thousands; and a celebration of stolen art.

Monday’s Daily Brief: Guterres on Bolivia and multilateralism, Syria and Iraq’s displaced, forest initiative, the healing arts

A recap of Monday’s stories in brief: UN chief spotlights multilateralism at peace forum; Bolivian authorities must uphold safety of citizens; new programme to feed Kenya’s children; experts concerned for detained in Syria and Iraq; UN forest management project fights climate crisis; and, from Warhol to the Wiggles – the role of art in keeping you healthy.

From Prince to Picasso, the arts can be just the tonic, new UN health agency study shows

From before birth, to the end of life, taking to the dance floor or sketching a still life, can positively affect our health and even prove more cost-effective than conventional medical treatment, the World Health Organisation (WHO) found in a new study published on Monday.

Creativity works as ‘catalyst’ to overcome slavery: artist Christopher Cozier

Since before the era of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, the arts have been used to confront slavery. Highlighting the importance of creativity as a force for change in societies where people were viewed first and foremost as property,  Christopher Cozier highlights the “self-worth process” that led slaves to become full citizens. 

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“I love my ocean and I want to protect it”: Aboriginal artist says

An Aboriginal Australian behind an exhibit at the United Nations has been using his art to sound the alarm over abandoned fishing nets.

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Art helps people understand "we are all the same": Tunisian painter

All people experience the “same feelings”, no matter which country they’re from, and art can help “open the heart”, a Tunisian artist has said.

Zeineb Tlili Ghali is a painter who specialises in images of women and landscapes in her North African homeland.

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Film festival in Lebanon seeks to unmask the lives of Syrian refugees

A film festival has been held for the first time in Beirut, Lebanon, in an attempt to expose the plight of Syrian refugees settling in the country.

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