Antimicrobial Resistance

News in Brief 9 June 2021

  • 'Mass deaths' alert across Myanmar: UN rights expert
  • 'Alarming' rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens: WHO
  • G7 nations must promote more equitable COVID vaccine access
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3'

Podcast - UN Catch-Up Dateline Geneva – Tackling ‘kissing bug’, Mosul’s Al-Nouri mosque rebirth

In this week’s UN Catch-Up, a chilling warning from the UN rights chief who’s likened the spiralling violence in Myanmar to Syria at the start of its decade-long war - and some welcome news about the rebuilding of Mosul’s great Al-Nouri Mosque, that suffered such terrible damage in the fight to clear ISIL extremists from the Iraqi city…

Also we’ll be finding out about a UN-partnered plan to tackle the “kissing bug” –  a neglected tropical disease which you definitely don’t want to embrace; it’s something that our regular guest Solange Behoteguy-Cortes remembers all too well from her childhood growing up in Bolivia…tune in to hear her story.

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13'45"

News in Brief 15 April 2021

  • Alert over shortage of new drugs for ‘world’s most dangerous bacteria’
  • COVID-19 cases rise for seventh consecutive week
  • Cheers in Iraq for winners of competition to rebuild Al-Nouri Mosque in Mosul: UNESCO
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2'40"

COVID cases surge amid growing threat from antimicrobial resistance – WHO chief 

More cases of COVID-19 have been reported in the past four weeks than in the first six months of the pandemic, the UN health agency chief told journalists on Friday as he launched a new report on the threat posed by antimicrobial resistance.

Silent Pandemic: Overuse renders antimicrobials less effective – UN agriculture agency

People, plants and animals around the world are dying from untreatable infections – even with the best medicines available – due to a rise in antimicrobial resistance, the UN food agriculture agency said on Wednesday, kicking off World Antimicrobial Awareness Week

Antimicrobial resistance - the next pandemic?

All around the world, people, plants and animals are dying from infections that cannot be treated – even with the best medicines available. 

That is because of the rise in antimicrobial resistance - the increasing failure of antibiotics and other life-saving drugs to treat diseases. 

It is a global problem that threatens to be the cause of the next pandemic, as the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Chief Veterinary Officer Keith Sumption explains to FAO’s Charlotta Lomas.  

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5'25"

UN health agency steps up fight against ‘invisible pandemic’ of antimicrobial resistance

As resistance to antibiotics grows, the World Health Organization (WHO) has launched the latest stage of its campaign to fight this deadly health risk – likened by the agency to an “invisible pandemic”– with the launch of a new online tool for health professionals on Tuesday.

UN, global health agencies sound alarm on drug-resistant infections; new recommendations to reduce ‘staggering number’ of future deaths

Deaths caused by infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria will skyrocket over the next two decades, along with huge economic costs, without immediate, ambitious and coordinated action, the UN World Health Organization (WHO) and partners warned on Monday.

Everyone has a role to play in global superbugs crisis

The overuse of antibiotics not just for human and animal health but also in food production is leading to an increased resistance of bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites to antimicrobial treatments, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).  Charlotte Lomas spoke with FAO’s Christine Czerniak and began by asking for a definition of antimicrobial resistance or AMR.

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6'59"

UN health agency finds high levels of antibiotic resistance to world’s most common infections

Antimicrobials have been a driver of unprecedented medical and societal advances, but their overuse has resulted in antibiotic resistant bacteria, with the World Health Organization (WHO) reporting new surveillance data on Monday which reveals widespread resistance to some of the world’s most common infections, including E. coli and pneumonia.