Adama Dieng

News in Brief 11 October 2017 (PM)

UN genocide prevention expert concludes visit to CAR

Those responsible for atrocities and inciting ethnic and religious hatred in the Central African Republic (CAR) will have to face justice, the UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide said on Wednesday.

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UN Daily News Programme 14 July 2017

Listen to a bulletin of news and features from the United Nations, with Matt Wells and Dianne Penn.

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Religious leaders find common ground to prevent future atrocities

Religious leaders from around the world are coming together at UN Headquarters on Friday to launch a new action plan aimed at preventing future genocide.

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UN Gender Focus: LGBTI UN workers, rape survivors and released Chibok girls

LGBTI workers get a boost from UN’s Michael Møller

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Rape survivors should never face “prison of stigma”

Survivors of rape or sexual slavery should never again face “the prison of stigma” described by some of them as a “living death”, the acting UN special envoy on sexual violence in conflict, has said.

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UN and Africa: focus on ICC; Libya and ending FGM

Withdrawing from ICC undermines international justice: UN expert

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UN and Africa: focus on oil prices, Burundi and South Sudan refugees in Uganda

Very significant shock” of lower oil prices in Africa

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Invest more in Rwanda says genocide prevention expert

More investment must be made in Rwanda, where people are still reeling from the 1994 genocide, a legal and human rights expert has recommended.

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Radio has the widest reach during disasters and emergencies

For the millions of people forced to abandon their homes during disasters and emergencies, radio remains the best way to communicate.

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Protecting Iraq’s minorities “part of our humanity” says genocide expert

Protecting Iraq’s “mosaic” of minorities is “part of our humanity”.

That’s according to Adama Dieng, the UN Special Adviser for the Prevention of Genocide, who has just returned from visiting those parts of Iraq where minorities are most at risk from violence, and even extinction.

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