FROM THE FIELD: Teaching Chad’s scientists of the future

9 February 2021

The study of science could have a “transformational” impact on young people living in different conflict areas across the world according to the UN’s Education Cannot Wait programme.

A pilot study in the city of Bol in Chad, which has suffered the effects of cross-border terrorism over many years, has shown that the provision of simple science-focused materials like a compass or protractor (which measures angles) is making a  big difference to both teachers and pupils in one of the poorest parts of the Central African country.

Two young students in Bol, Chad show their work on a blackboard at school. UNICEF/Frank Dejongh

Ten teachers and 775 students, half of whom are girls, have received the supplies so far and it’s hoped eventually more than 12,000 will benefit.

Ahead of International Day of Women and Girls in Science marked annually on 11 February read more here about Chad’s future scientists.

Read more stories here from Education Cannot Wait.

 

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