FROM THE FIELD: Hardy seeds bear fruit to protect Colombia’s environment

30 April 2019

Communities in Colombia in South America are being helped by the UN Development Programme (UNDP) to preserve and reintroduce indigenous crops as a way to combat the effects of climate change.

Photo: UNDP | In the community’s newly-built seed bank, bottles are catalogued with species’ names, so that locals can sow, distribute, and exchange them with other communities.

The Antioquia region, a key agricultural area, has experienced steadily rising temperatures and now dry seasons are lasting longer. Rains, when they arrive, are more intense and often lead to flooding.

In response, local farmers have been working with the UN to identify crops which are more resistant to drought and flooding.

Seeds, including cashew, loquat and tamarind have been collected using age-old indigenous knowledge and now the efforts of farmers are beginning to bear fruit.

 

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Ancient crops to be deposited in Norway’s Arctic seed vault for future generations – UN

As a significant step towards preserving the world’s most important ancient crops for future generations, the head of the United Nations agriculture agency, together with scientists and delegations from Peru, Costa Rica and Norway, today witnessed a ceremony during which potato seeds were deposited to the “safety box” in Arctic seed vault.