UN helps launch Beijing Olympics campaign about HIV/AIDS

1 August 2008

Information about AIDS, condoms and anti-discrimination messages are being distributed to participants in this year’s Beijing Olympics, thanks to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the Chinese organizing committee for the games.

Information about AIDS, condoms and anti-discrimination messages are being distributed to participants in this year’s Beijing Olympics, thanks to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the Chinese organizing committee for the games.

“Olympic athletes are helping break down barriers of stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV,” Peter Piot, UNAIDS Executive Director, said today at the launch of the campaign in the Chinese capital.

“They are also well placed to carry the messages across countries and cultures to inspire people to adopt behaviours that protect them against HIV,” Dr. Piot added.

In the clinic at the Olympic Village, some 100,000 high quality condoms are available for distribution along with information on HIV prevention and anti-discrimination in English, French and Chinese.

In addition, all Olympians have received a fact sheet and two AIDS video spots featuring the Chinese basketball star Yao Ming and Michael Ballack, the German footballer and UNAIDS Special Representative.

The campaign aims at reaching Olympic athletes, members of the national delegations and the more than 100,000 volunteers supporting the games, using the event to amplify key HIV and AIDS messages globally.

 

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