Côte d’Ivoire: UN mission speaks out against violence

31 December 2007

The United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI) expressed concern today over recent violence in Bouaké, in the north of the divided West African nation.

In a press release, UNOCI condemned the latest developments – including clashes of a “military nature,” illegal and abusive arrests, as well as summary executions – which it said “violate human rights,” and called on authorities to take measures to bring an end to them.

“UNOCI calls for a thorough investigation into these events and for those responsible to be judged in accordance with the law,” it added.

The mission urged both sides to desist from actions endangering the country’s peace process.

It also appealed to the parties to push forward with implementing this March’s Ouagadougou Peace Agreement, which seeks to end the conflict which has divided Côte d’Ivoire between the Government-controlled south and the rebel Forces Nouvelles-held north since 2002.

That accord outlines a series of measures, including: the creation of a new transitional government; organizing free and fair presidential elections; the merging of the Forces Nouvelles and the national defence and security forces through the establishment of an integrated command centre; the dismantling of militias and disarming of ex-combatants; and the replacement of the so-called zone of confidence separating north and south with a green line to be monitored by UNOCI.

 

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