At UN debate, Singapore calls for ‘gradual evolution’ of key global institutions

At UN debate, Singapore calls for ‘gradual evolution’ of key global institutions

A gradual evolution in global governance is necessary to make the world’s leading institutions, including the United Nations Security Council, mirror today’s “multi-polar reality,” Singapore’s Foreign Minister has told the General Assembly.

A gradual evolution in global governance is necessary to make the world’s leading institutions, including the United Nations Security Council, mirror today’s “multi-polar reality,” Singapore’s Foreign Minister has told the General Assembly.

Addressing the annual high-level debate, George Yeo said it was time for the key institutions to reflect the world of the current era and not that prevailing at the end of World War II, when so many were established.

“The reform of the UN, including the UN Security Council, should take into account the weight of India, Japan, Germany and Brazil, and the growing importance of regional organizations,” Mr. Yeo said.

“Selection for heads of the IMF [International Monetary Fund] and the World Bank should be widened. Membership of the G8 should be enlarged to include countries like China and India.”

At the same time, Mr. Yeo stressed that it was important to still work with these institutions as they are, as not as States might wish them to be.

“Unless there is another global conflagration, the improvement of global governance can only be achieved through gradual evolution, not revolution.”

Brunei’s Foreign Minister, Prince Mohamed Bolkiah, said civil society, including non-governmental organizations (NGOs), also deserved a much greater say in world affairs.

“This means giving ordinary people a place in the consensus,” he said, adding he was encouraged by the statements so far of General Assembly President Srgjan Kerim regarding the need for multilateral solutions to the world’s most intractable problems.

“We certainly agree with the need for the United Nations to strengthen its central position in the multilateral system.”