Security Council establishes UN political mission in Nepal to help build peace

23 January 2007

The Security Council today established a United Nations political mission in Nepal to oversee the peace process in the tiny Himalayan country, following an historic agreement reached last November by the Maoists and Government aimed at ending 10 years of bloody civil war that killed around 15,000 people and displaced over 100,000 others.

The Security Council today established a United Nations political mission in Nepal to oversee the peace process in the tiny Himalayan country, following an historic agreement reached last November by the Maoists and Government aimed at ending 10 years of bloody civil war that killed around 15,000 people and displaced over 100,000 others.

By a unanimously adopted resolution, the Council decided that the UN political mission in Nepal (UNMIN), to be headed by a Special Representative of the Secretary-General, will have 12-month mandate which could be terminated or extended depending on a request from the Government.

The Council also took note of the Secretary-General’s expectation that the operation “will be a focussed mission of limited duration.”

The resolution outlined main tasks for the mission, which will manage arms and armed personnel from both the Government and Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), in line with the provisions of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, and support this year’s planned elections.

As part of its work, the UNMIN will “provide technical support for the planning, preparation and conduct of the election of a Constituent Assembly in a free and fair atmosphere, in consultation with the parties” and “provide a small team of electoral monitors to review all technical aspects of the electoral process, and report on the conduct of the election.”

The Council noted that both sides had asked for UN assistance in implementing key aspects of the peace deal, and also recognized the “strong desire of the Nepalese people for peace and the restoration of democracy.” The 15-member body further highlighted the need to pay “special attention” to the needs of women, children and traditionally marginalized groups in the peace process.

An advance team of 35 UN monitors is already in Nepal and has begun registering and storing weapons of the former combatants.

 

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