UNEP at 50: Solving the world’s environmental challenges

In Grenada, Molinere Bay suffered considerable storm damage from Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Underwater sculptures  have provided a base for coral attachments and marine life proliferation.
UNEP/NOOR/Kadir van Lohuizen
In Grenada, Molinere Bay suffered considerable storm damage from Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Underwater sculptures have provided a base for coral attachments and marine life proliferation.
From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale.
WMO/Shravan Regret Iyer
Press Briefing by Executive Director of UNEP
©UN Photo/Yutaka Nagata
During the last couple of decades, the mountain gorilla population in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda has steadily increased to more than 400.
UNEP/Kibuuka Mukisa
In conjunction with local communities, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) works with the REEFolution Foundation to restore and conserve coral reefs in developing countries.
UNEP/Stephanie Foote
Le Thi Luan applies home-made biochar to her smallholding in Quang Chu commune, which has increased her rice and maize yield by 15 to 20 per cent.
UNEP/Lisa Murray
Torrespaña television tower in Madrid, Spain.
UNEP/Duncan Moore
Slash-and-burn agriculture, as pictured here, continues to take a heavy toll on Madagascar’s natural heritage.
UNEP/Lisa Murray
The loss of sea ice accelerates global warming and changes climate patterns.
© NASA/Kathryn Hansen