Interviews

‘What a man can do, a woman can do better’: UN Female Police Officer of the Year

Deployed with the UN Stabilization Mission (MONUSCO) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, since March 2017, after serving in Darfur and Mali, UN Police Officer (UNPOL) Seynabou Diouf from Senegal, helps empower women and survivors of sexual violence across the region. On Tuesday, she received the 2019 United Nations Female Police Officer of the Year Award at UN Headquarters in New York. Speaking before the ceremony, Major Diouf told UN News’s Pascal Sim, that it’s essential to have more women serving UN Peacekeeping, and that “what a man can do, a woman can do better”.

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12'21"

Commitment, not slogans, key to ending violence against children: UN expert

One billion children—or half the world’s youngsters—are victims of violence, ranging from conflict and humanitarian crises to cyberbullying and recruitment by terrorist groups.

That’s according to UN expert Najat Maalla M’jid who advocates for governments, civil society and other stakeholders to put children at the heart of their policies.  May Yaacoub asked her about progress in the global effort to protect children.

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8'26"

Record-levels of smog in New Delhi making ‘the invisible killer, a visible killer’: UN expert

The unbearable levels of air pollution in India’s New Delhi, declared a public health emergency by the local government as of Monday, have made “the invisible killer, visible”. 

That’s from Valentin Foltescu, Senior Programme Management Officer for the UN Environment Programme in India, UNEP, who said that current levels of toxic particles in the capital are 40 times higher than the upper limit of exposure, recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO)

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7'49"

Building resilience on Colombia's border: FAO

La Guajira, Colombia’s northernmost region, is dry with desert landscapes. It’s prone to drought and food insecurity particularly in rural areas. In recent years, the economic crisis in neighboring Venezuela has pushed over a million migrants across the border, including 165,000 people into La Guajira. The influx  has put a strain on host communities, where food is limited and natural resources scarce, so the UN Food and Agriculture Organization decided to take action.

From FAO, Anais Hotin and Charlotta Lomas have this special report. 

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7'10"

LGBTI discrimination still pervasive ‘in every region of the world’: UN rights expert

Discrimination and violence towards members of the LGBTI community continues to be pervasive in every region of the world, with same-sex marriages still considered a crime in 69 countries. 

That’s from Victor Madrigal-Borloz, the UN Independent Expert on protection against violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, who presented a new report to the General Assembly last week outlining how negative notions of LGBTI people manifest, and how best to stop them

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10'21"

Governments cannot stay silent on human rights abuses: UN rights expert

UN human rights expert Agnès Callamard has been involved in some of the most talked-about stories of the past year..

Shortly after she called on the Maltese authorities to do more to find those responsible for the death of Maltese journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, Conor Lennon from UN News asked her if she was surprised that the investigation into the death of Ms. Galizia has not made more progress.

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14'42"

‘In international law you need two to tango’: senior official explains workings of UN world court

The International Court of Justice is an integral part of the United Nations.

Conor Lennon from UN News caught up with Philippe Gautier, the newly appointed Registrar of the ICJ, and started by asking him to explain the role the ICJ plays on the world stage.

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22'58"

Contemporary slavery often 'invisible and clandestine': UN rights expert

As the first human rights issue to provoke wide international, slavery is perpetuated by traditional practices such as child and forced marriage, and by the fact that almost half the countries in the world have yet to criminalize it.

According to the latest UN figures, 40 million people were living in a state of modern slavery in 2016. One in four children are in forced labour, and about 98 per cent of women who are in forced labour have also been subjected to sexual exploitation.

Deeply rooted in fear, with victims often “not realizing” they’re enslaved, it becomes "invisible", and "clandestine”, leaving victims unprotected, said Urmila Bhoola, Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Slavery, who sat down with UN News's Ana Carmo to talk through its causes and consequences.

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12'11"

The future of the planet ‘clearly in our hands’: top climate change scientist

There are clear benefits to keeping the earth’s temperature below two degrees; and the “choices we make now will be critical for the future of our oceans and cryosphere”.

That’s the message from Anjal Prakash, Coordinating Lead Author of the latest UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC report, on the havoc being unleashed on the earth’s oceans and ice caps. He spoke to UN News’s Sachin Gaur.

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9'20"

UN pavilion will feature in Dubai, at Arab world’s first global Expo

London’s Crystal Palace provided the venue for the first ever World Expo back in 1851, and next year, the Arab region hosts the iconic global event for the first time, which will include a United Nations pavilion, the Organization announced on Thursday.

Under the theme “We the peoples shaping our future together”, the space will focus on “the people the United Nations serve, rather than the institution”.

That’s according to Maher Nasser, Director of Outreach for the UN’s Department of Global Communications, who’s leading the UN team at Expo 2020.

He spoke to UN News’s May Yaacoub.

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